Welcome to DisneyBizJournal.com - News, Analysis and Reviews of the Disney Entertainment Business!

Brought to fans, investors, entrepreneurs, executives, teachers, professors, and students by columnist, economist, novelist, reviewer, podcaster, business reporter and speaker Ray Keating

Wednesday, June 19, 2024

Disney Biz Journal’s Ray Keating Publishes His Second Alliance of Saint Michael Novel - “Subversion” Follows on the Well-Received “Cathedral”

 News

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 19, 2024

 

Did you know that Disney Biz Journal’s Ray Keating also is a novelist? His latest book – Subversion: An Alliance of Saint Michael Novel – is a nail-biting work of historical fiction. This book follows on Cathedral: An Alliance of Saint Michael Novel.

 

Ray Keating talks about his new book – 
Subversion: An Alliance of Saint Michael Novel


What’s happening in Keating’s book? With the Nazis on the rise in Germany, the Alliance of Saint Michael is called into action to aid a Jewish businessman and art collector in Berlin, while also countering pro-Nazi rumblings in America. The Alliance of Saint Michael brings together Catholic, Lutheran, Anglican and Orthodox men and women with varied backgrounds and assorted talents to work against the two most significant threats to Christianity and civilization at the dawn of the 1930s - communism and fascism.

 

In Subversion, a priest is murdered on Long Island. Meanwhile, in Germany, a Jewish businessman and his wife are targeted for violence by members of the Nazi Party. What do these two events possibly have in common? Members of the Alliance of Saint Michael find themselves at the center of each situation, as they work to aid those in danger while countering Nazi lies within the Church.

 

Subversion is a work of historical fiction that hits hard on matters like antisemitism and politics corrupting the Church, while also being filled with characters that readers can care about and respect, thrilling action, love and friendship, and reflections on faith and helping others.

 

Keating, who also has penned 19 Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries (with more coming), said, “As I get deeper into the Alliance of Saint Michael series, I not only get to write some exciting historical fiction, but also explore how various individuals think and react with evil on the rise in what’s supposed to be a ‘civilized’ place. And yes, these are questions that have long plagued and continue to challenge humanity.”

 

Paperbacks and the Kindle editions of Subversion and Cathedral are available at Amazon.com, and signed books at www.RayKeatingBooksandMore.com.

 

Ray Keating is the editor, publisher and economist for DisneyBizJournal.com; and author of the Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries, the Alliance of Saint Michael novels, and assorted nonfiction books. Have Ray Keating speak your group, business, school, church, or organization. Email him at raykeating@keatingreports.com.

Finally Riding Tiana’s Bayou Adventure

 by Beth Keating

Review

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 19, 2024

 

I’ll say it right up front – I’ve never been a big fan of log flume rides.  I don’t like spending the rest of my day squishing through the parks with wet shoes, or even worse, wet clothes.  But more than that, those big drops terrify me.



That all being said, I wasn’t especially heartbroken that Splash Mountain was being re-themed. The other members of the family were, however. (My husband even bought me a framed poster of the “Fifty Foot Plunge Ahead” Splash Mountain sign for Christmas one year. Pretty sure that was something he liked, as I was not a Splash “ride or die” fan.). And we’d never seen (or frankly, even been aware of) the Song of the South movie that the ride was based on. We just knew it as a critter story about a fox and bear chasing a rabbit.  Honestly, not even sure we looked that far into that storyline, because the audio on the ride was always so terrible that you just relied on the visuals to figure out what was going on.


Toward the end, no one would argue that Splash Mountain was in serious need of some TLC.  More animatronics were not working than were.  Time to upgrade.



Enter the re-theme of the mountain. We finally got to ride the new “Tiana’s Bayou Adventure” at Magic Kingdom during Annual Passholder previews this week, but it was not without its trials. The ride formally opens to park guests on June 28, but there have been a  number of preview groups in the meantime. In the past, Disney has set it up so that you would go online to a specific link during a select window to choose a day and time to ride a new attraction during passholder previews. By the end of that window, you knew if you’d successfully won a seat, and what the time frame was.  You could plan ahead.


This time around, there was a new, very loose framework for riding during passholder previews. You just showed up at the park with your park reservation in hand, and tried for a virtual queue (not always a successful venture on a normal visit).  It meant that you were taking a random day off from work, showing up, and hoping for the best, without knowing whether you’d actually be riding.

  
It did not go well for us on day #1.  We didn’t snag a virtual queue in those precious few milliseconds when the “join queue” button lit up.  (If you’ve ever stressed making a virtual queue, you know what I mean!). “Day off” used up without riding the preview.  And while a day at Disney is always better than a day at work, we’d burned a vacation day that could have been better arranged.



The preview process has been a bit fraught with challenges on Disney’s end as well.  Passholder previews, media previews, and cast member days are a bit like a dress rehearsal for a new attraction, and it’s a chance to work the bugs out.  But Tiana’s previews had more bumps in the road (or water, as it were) than most openings, particularly considering that it was a re-skin of an existing ride.  There was lots of down time, late starts that threw the rest of the day’s riders out of synch, and even a few “in show exits.”

  
After several tries to grab a virtual queue, my son and I finally got to ride (not so the rest of the family).  I was pleasantly surprised by the fact that the ride was better than what I was expecting, given how poor the original POV video from Disney was.



In true Imagineering fashion, there were lots of details to take in along the queues.  I would have liked to have had more time to take a closer look at the family letters and photos on the wall, the newspaper clippings scattered throughout, and even the tchotchkes on the shelves. (There’s a set of a ceramic bear, fox and bunny on one shelf as an easter egg tribute to the former ride!).



The queue is well done, and I’m sure that each time you ride, you’ll spot more “stuff.”  Radio broadcasts set the mood for the time period, and you’ll recognize music from the Princess and the Frog animated film, as well as some original tunes. You’ll be wandering through Tiana’s office, checking out her spice cabinets and shipping boxes, peeking into her kitchen and seeing the beignets and gumbo pot, and then heading down the caverns of the old salt mine that Tiana has converted for her employee-owned company.



On the ride itself, I was most surprised by the size of the animatronics. They were so much bigger in person than I expected.  The audio track was light years better than the old one (but still a touch convoluted story-wise – it was initially hard to understand that Mama Odie was “shrinking you down” in the one segment. It didn’t take long to figure it out, but it wasn’t instantaneous.).  The spotlight figures of Tiana and Louis were very fluid, much more like the super cool newer models we’ve been seeing in Tokyo Disney and elsewhere.  There were also a number of adorable critters that were more like traditional animatronics throughout the ride.  A few of those are sure to become favorites of guests.   (Sorry I wasn’t able to get on-ride pictures of the animatronics for you.  I was afraid of getting my phone wet, so it was safely stowed in my Ziplock bag in my backpack!)


One of the most common complaints on Disney chats (not just about the Tiana ride, either) is Disney’s reliance on screen-based tech, and fans were skeptical about how the use of the screens would impact Tiana’s ride.  I did find it a bit jarring in the “shrunk down room,”  with enormous Tiana and Louis faces peering in, but I thought the screens really helped to add to the depth and the kinetic energy in the finale scene, where the party is taking place and there are lots of guests dancing and singing.  The front of the scene is comprised of three-dimensional physical sets with animatronics, including many of your favorite characters from the movie, such as Ralphie, Lottie, and Naveen, but the restaurant façade behind the characters is comprised of screen tech in the restaurant windows, filled with lots of other guests.  It’s a party!  In this case, the screen tech works, and fills out the rest of the scene.



On the downside, the logs themselves were a little bumpier than anticipated.  The underwater track is the same as the Splash Mountain one, and I expected that the ride would be smoother given the refurb, but the logs were scraping (and squealing) in a few places, and there were a few rough clunks along the way.  For those of you that enjoy the spray of swampy bayou water on your log flumes, this ride also seemed to get us much wetter than the old Splash…. Maybe that’s just my memory, but my son seemed happy with the splashier ride. Be reassured that when the Critter Co-op store launches to all park guests at the end of the month, there will be towels available for sale.  Just in case.

 

__________

 

Beth Keating is a theme parks, restaurant and entertainment reporter for DisneyBizJournal.

 

Get The Disney Planner: The TO DO List Solution by Ray Keating. More information at

https://raykeatingbooksandmore.com/shop/ols/products/disneyplanner.  A PDF version is available here.  And please listen to the Daily Dose of Disney with Ray Keating podcast

Tuesday, June 18, 2024

Changes Coming to Frontierland in Disney World This Month

 by Beth Keating

News

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 18, 2024

 

There will be a few changes coming to Frontierland at the Magic Kingdom in Disney World in the next month or so, and that doesn’t even include whatever will be announced for the “Beyond Thunder Mountain” project.



On June 28Tiana’s Bayou Adventure will officially open to park guests, though there has already been some activity at the old salt mine with cast member, annual passholder, DVC and media previews. Kiddos must be 40 inches tall to ride the former Splash Mountain/rethemed attraction. While Tiana and her critter band will be bringing the crowds back to that corner of the Magic Kingdom, Big Thunder Mountain is expected to close shortly for its own refurb, based on recent construction permits that have been filed, so crowd levels will surely ebb and flow in that quadrant of the park.



On July 17, 2024, the Country Bears will be back in their all new “Country Bear Musical Jamboree.” The music will be updated in a more modern “Nashville style,” and the songs will include popular Disney tunes in a “countrified” format. The audio-animatronic bears will be sporting fresh new costumes as well.  The Country Bear Jamboree was an opening day attraction at Disney World, swinging open the doors of Grizzly Hall on October 1, 1971.  It was one of the last attractions that Walt Disney personally helped develop, and was originally set to debut at a never-built Disney ski resort, but moved to Florida instead.

 
And lastly, another opening day attraction, the Frontierland Shootin’ Arcade, will see its final day of operation on June 23.  It is being replaced by a Disney Vacation Club lounge.  The Arcade, located next to the Country Bear Jamboree, is an Old West-style shooting gallery, using infrared rifles to take on a hundred different targets.  The shooting gallery is themed to Boot Hill in the frontier town of Tombstone, Arizona, and is currently free to participate.




The new DVC Lounge is the first in the Magic Kingdom, and will have décor “inspired by the bygone era of exploration and adventure.” The Grand Opening date for the lounge has not been set as of yet. The DVC lounge in EPCOT at the Imagination Pavilion is currently undergoing renovations and has set up a temporary home in the Odyssey Pavilion, and there is also a DVC lounge at Bay Lake Tower at the Contemporary Resort.


And if you are scoping out the changes in Frontierland, don’t forget to mosey up to the counter at the Golden Oak Outpost, where you can grab an order of the new “Tiana’s Famous Beignets,” which will be available from June 28 through September 6.

__________

 

Beth Keating is a theme parks, restaurant and entertainment reporter for DisneyBizJournal.

 

Get The Disney Planner: The TO DO List Solution by Ray Keating. More information at

https://raykeatingbooksandmore.com/shop/ols/products/disneyplanner.  A PDF version is available here.  And please listen to the Daily Dose of Disney with Ray Keating podcast

Monday, June 17, 2024

Seven Disney Restaurants Rank in Orlando Sentinel’s Foodie Awards for Summer 2024

 by Beth Keating

News

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 17, 2024

 

Disney World restaurants have been honored in four of the eleven categories during the recently released Summer Quarter of the “Orlando Sentinel’s Foodie Awards.”

 

The annual awards are typically given in more than 50 categories, but this year, they are being announced quarterly because there are over 300 restaurants as part of the review process.  In order to give each category their moment to shine, and to make the process more manageable, the Orlando Sentinel is now issuing their awards quarterly, with different categories in each quarter.



In the Best Splurge category, Victoria & Albert’s at the Grand Floridian earned a runners-up slot in the Reader’s Choice section.  But in the Best Theme Park Restaurant division, it was a Disney sweep - Disney took home all four slots.  The Critic’s Choice went to Skipper Canteen at Magic Kingdom, while the Reader’s Choice named The Hollywood Brown Derby in Hollywood Studios the winner, with Yak & Yeti Restaurant at Disney’s Animal Kingdom and San Angel Inn Restaurante at EPCOT as runners-up.



Best Wine Bar in the Orlando area?  The Readers named Wine Bar George in Disney Springs their choice.  Best Japanese?  The Disney adjacent Swan and Dolphin’s Kimonos garnered one of the Reader’s Choice runners-up spots.

 
The Summer Quarter Foodie Awards named winners and runners-up in the following groupings:  Best ChineseBest DessertBest Hotel RestaurantBest IndianBest JapaneseBest KoreanBest SplurgeBest ThaiBest Theme Park RestaurantBest Vietnamese and Best Wine Bar.  (You can check the previous “Winter Quarter” awards here, with fourteen other categories.)

 

Here's a look at the other restaurants that were cooking up the competition in the same categories as the Disney winners for the summer session:

 

• 2024 Orlando Sentinel Foodie Awards: Best Splurge

 

Critic’s Choice

Winner: 

Camille, 4962 New Broad St. in Orlando.

 

Readers’ Choice

Winner: Bull & Bear, 14200 Bonnet Creek Resort Lane in Orlando.

Runners-up: Victoria & Albert’s at Disney’s Grand Floridian, and Trabucco in Orlando.

 

• 2024 Orlando Sentinel Foodie Awards: Best Theme Park Restaurant

 

Critic’s Choice

Winner:  Jungle Navigation Co. LTD Skipper Canteen in Magic Kingdom.

 

Readers’ Choice

Winner: The Hollywood Brown Derby at Disney’s Hollywood Studios.

Runners-up: Yak & Yeti Restaurant at Disney’s Animal Kingdom and San Angel Inn Restaurante at EPCOT.



• 2024 Orlando Sentinel Foodie Awards: Best Wine Bar

 

Critic’s Choice

Winner: Golden Hour Wine, 1560 Lake Baldwin Lane in Orlando.

 

Readers’ Choice

Winner: Wine Bar George at Disney Springs.

Runners-up: VINIA Wine & Kitchen in Winter Park and The Wine Room in Winter Park.


• 2024 Orlando Sentinel Foodie Awards: Best Japanese

 

Critic’s Choice

Winner: Sushi Kichi, 5368 Central Florida Parkway in Orlando.

 

Readers’ Choice

Winner: Seito Sushi, 4898 New Broad St. in Orlando and 8031 Turkey Lake Road in Orlando.

Runners-up: Tori Tori in Orlando and Kimonos at the Swan and Dolphin at Disney.


__________

 

Beth Keating is a theme parks, restaurant and entertainment reporter for DisneyBizJournal.

 

Get The Disney Planner: The TO DO List Solution by Ray Keating. More information at

https://raykeatingbooksandmore.com/shop/ols/products/disneyplanner.  A PDF version is available here.  And please listen to the Daily Dose of Disney with Ray Keating podcast

Sunday, June 16, 2024

Space 220 Offers Galactic Level Meals, But at Out-of-this-World Pricing

 by Beth Keating

Review

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 16, 2024

 

When you dine at Disney World, you have a choice of more than 200 different eateries. Many of them are uniquely themed, and Imagineers went all in on some of the details. 



 

Want to dine at Beast’s castle?  You’ll feel like you are in the movie by dining at Be Our Guest.  Want to take an expedition across Asia?  Yak & Yeti will offer you and your fellow travelers a place to rest and refresh on the journey.  Waiting for a cruise through the jungle?  Skipper Canteen will help you prepare for the journey amidst a plethora of puns.



For a family member’s recent birthday, the choice was to dine in space.  (He said it made him feel like he was dining in Ten Forward on the Enterprise.)  After years of trying to snag a reservation for the nearly three-year-old Space 220 restaurant in EPCOT, we were able to grab one, probably because someone else had to cancel, as this lone available reservation popped up on a random day and time.  Everything else had been booked up for weeks on end.  For our purposes, though, the random date was close enough to the actual birthday to warrant scooping it up.



Your meal will be served 220 miles above earth (Space 220, get it?), and you’ll need to take a space elevator to get up to the space station. Viewports provide an aerial view of EPCOT as you travel, and you’ll see the Florida landscape below you as you rush upwards in the “stellarvator,” as well as the view to the space dock as you approach the station above you.  When you reach your destination, you’ll pass by a window into the grow lab where lettuce rotates in preparation for harvest.



As you enter the dining room, you’ll understand why Space 220 is one of the hardest reservations to get on Disney property.  Floor to ceiling glass at the front of the room allows you to look back on Earth, and to watch the various spaceships and astronauts floating by.  There’s even a space dog going for a walk.



Dining at Space 220 is a thrill, but a costly one.  While our meals were good, overall, and the service was better than most Disney restaurants, it’s still a pricey night out.  You are paying for those giant windows into space.


Meals at Space 220 are a fixed price affair. Adult dinner pricing is $79.00, and you get to select one of each: Lift-Offs (Appetizer); Star Course (Entrée); and Supernova Sweets (Dessert).  Lunch is a slightly cheaper prospect at $55.00 (and you can use an Annual Passholder discount for lunch. Dinner is a DVC discount only.).  For lunch, you’ll select one of each: Lift-Offs (Appetizer) and Star Course (Entrée).  If you are lucky enough, you can also grab a walk-up at the small bar, where you can order a la cart.



For our meal, we chose the Neptuna Tartare and the Big Bang Burrata for the appetizer course.  The Neptuna Tartare was made from Yellow Fin Tuna, with an Avocado Crema, Mango Coulis, Edamame, Wonton Crisp, and a Yuzu Dressing.  The tuna itself was sashimi grade, extremely light and fresh.  The dressing was unexpectedly sweet, but in a delightful way that added contrast.  There was also a smidge of wasabi that brought a bit of heat to the dish, but not so much that those who are less tolerant of heat would be uncomfortable. There was a little bit of spice to the dish,  but it was not what we would call “spicy.”  Our very attentive waiter was sure to check on the wasabi adaptability before we finalized our order!



The Big Bang Burrata was a dish of panzanella and watermelon salad, with a lovely tarragon dressing for garnish.  This appetizer was one of two plates for the evening that were different from what other guests had ordered in the past, and what we’d seen online.  Where previous iterations of this appetizer had been a full ball of burrata, tonight’s version was just a half ball.  Nonetheless, the burrata was soft and milky, and the freshness of the cheese absolutely came through.  A crunchy bread stick (akin to a biscotti) served as the panzanella, and it had a brush of tomato chutney across the top, similar to a bruschetta.  It wasn’t the best part of the dish, though, because it was super hard to bite into, and we left most of it on the plate.  Sweet multicolored cherry tomatoes and small cubes of watermelon completed the dish, with everything arranged on a bed of arugula, which added a nice “salad” touch and a bit of a peppery flavor.  The light tarragon dressing was delicious, and had a hint of citrus, in our opinion.

  
We would have ordered both of our appetizers again.

  
For our Star Course (entrées), we requested the Grilled Swordfish and the Galactic Miso Salmon. Our waiter said those were both popular, and delicious, choices, and he was right.



The fennel-crusted Grilled Swordfish was plated on a bed of Mediterranean couscous and creamy puttanesca.  The excellent piece of swordfish was a thick, steak-like fish, rather than the flakier version that you get with some white fish, and well grilled.  The accompanying couscous was seasoned with tiny, diced vegetables and a bit of an oil drizzle.  The tomato based sauce accompanying the fish was like a smooth, high quality bisque, sweet and deeply “tomatoey.”  We would have been happy to have an entire bowl of that sauce. Our waiter checked to make sure that we enjoyed fennel when we ordered the entrée, explaining that it took some guests off guard, but we thoroughly enjoyed the addition of that flavor profile.  Thumbs-up for the swordfish!



Our other entrée was the Galactic Miso Salmon, a hearty-sized piece of glazed salmon, on top of sautéed leeks, served with a tempura-fried mushroom and a curry blood orange beurre blanc.  We can honestly say that this was one of the best salmons we’ve been served on Disney property, and it was perfectly grilled, with a tender, fork flaky texture.  The miso glaze on top added a hint of sweetness and a little bit of a crunchy outer layer, but underneath, the fish was moist and mild tasting, an excellent combination of contrasts.  A deep fried mushroom was a nice accompaniment, adding a crunchy, earthy texture alongside the softer fish.  Served on a bed of vibrant vegetables made of shredded sautéed leeks, the dish was a lovely mix of flavors.  The beurre blanc sauce was not at all sweet, but had a tiny bit of heat on the follow through.  With a light background of citrus (and maybe turmeric), the sauce was a yummy addition to the fish without overwhelming the salmon’s more delicate flavor or sweet outer crust.



Then it was on to the dessert course. One of our choices was the Blue Planet, a chocolate cheesecake, with cookie crumbs, vanilla truffles, and raspberry gel.  This was a good dessert, but certainly not cheesecake by any means.  In fact, it wasn’t even the dessert I was expecting, based on the same named dessert that another family member had ordered several months ago.  Their version was a large circle of chocolate cheesecake with a swirl of chocolate mousse that upheld a trio of large flat triangular chocolate “sails” on top.  And that was what we were expecting. I even asked the waiter when he brought the plate if that was the “cheesecake.”  He assured me it was, and that the menu had changed since last one of our family members had been there.

  
Alas, it was a nice dessert, but not really cheesecake.  The blue gel over the top (hence the “blue planet” name) didn’t really have much flavor, just lots of bright color.  There was also an adorable raspberry gel in the shape of Mickey on top of a green chocolate “lace” decoration. A set of three white chocolate truffles decorated the sprinkle of chocolate cookie crumbs surrounding the “planet.” The crumbs were meant to resemble space dirt, and the inside of the truffles were as liquid-y and creamy as any truffles ever offered. As a fan of white chocolate, they were a nice touch.



Our second dessert choice was The Astra, a honey cake with almond mascarpone mousse, orange marmalade, orange cream, and an adorable honeycomb cookie. This dessert was also a lovely choice, but a bit unexpected as well.  It was advertised as a honey cake, but was really more of a pudding.  This cute dessert was very sweet, and orange to the extreme, with real orange pieces in the mix.  If you are a visitor to Florida, and looking for the hit of citrus, this is your dessert.


The drinks at Space 220 were pricey, even by Disney standards, and they were obviously geared toward staying galactically themed.  They were beautiful to look at, and we probably would have skipped them at the higher prices, but as we were celebrating a birthday during the meal, we threw caution to the wind and ordered up.  The smooth Gamma Burst ($19.00) was Grey Goose Strawberry Lemongrass, Midori Melon Liqueur, and Strawberry Popping Pearls.  The pearls were definitely a fun twist, and it was a unique drink that you probably won’t find at other locations.  The Command Center ($17.00) was Conniption Kinship Gin, St-Germain Elderflower Liqueur, Lemon Juice, and Freeze-dried Raspberries.  The freeze-dried raspberries looked like a sprinkle of space dust across the surface of the drink.  While the raspberries were an interesting addition, the Command Center itself was a more standard gin-based drink.



While it is located inside EPCOT, in the World Discovery section of the park, the restaurant is actually operated by the Patina Restaurant Group, which runs dozens of eateries across the country.  At Disney World, their restaurants include Tutto Italia, Tutto Gusto and Via Napoli in EPCOT; and The Edison, Maria & Enzo’s, Enzo’s Hideaway, Pizza Ponte and Morimoto Asia in Disney Springs.


The difficulty of obtaining a dining reservation aside, we probably won’t be back to Space 220 any time soon. The food was good, but at the fixed three-course prices, and the inability to use passholder discounts, means that this dinner was a steep price point for a meal.  We had great service from cast members, and the views from the massive windows were really entertaining, waiting to see what space citizens would show up next. But a return to space station Centauri will be a “special occasion only” trip in the future. 

 

__________

 

Beth Keating is a theme parks, restaurant and entertainment reporter for DisneyBizJournal.

 

Get The Disney Planner: The TO DO List Solution by Ray Keating. More information at

https://raykeatingbooksandmore.com/shop/ols/products/disneyplanner.  A PDF version is available here.  And please listen to the Daily Dose of Disney with Ray Keating podcast

Thursday, June 13, 2024

Second Vote Approves Big Investment in Disney World

 by Ray Keating

News

DisneyBizJournal.com

June 13, 2024

 

As expected, the Central Florida Tourism Oversight District’s board’s second vote on a $17-billion-investment, 15-year plan for Walt Disney World was a unanimous approval on June 12.

 

As widely noted, there’s much speculation as to what the $17 billion will be spent on, but Disney has offered no details. 


Courtesy of Imdb.com


The Orlando Sentinel reported, “The agreement includes a commitment of an $8 billion investment during the first 10 years and up to $17 billion over 20. In return, the district committed to road and other infrastructure projects to support the growth… The agreement covers about 17,300 acres owned by Disney, according to a summary of the deal. It authorizes a maximum of five major theme parks, one more than Disney operates in Central Florida now. It also allows a maximum of five minor theme parks, such as a water park, nearly 1.3 million square feet of office space, 1.7 million square feet of restaurant/retail space and 53,467 hotel rooms.”

 

Yes, Disney and the board set up by Governor Ron DeSantis are now friends, with presidential politics passing DeSantis by, for now.

 

As for the widespread speculation, at this point, it is nothing more than that, with some people looking forward to the “D23: The Ultimate Disney Fan Event” in August perhaps for more details.

 

__________

 

Ray Keating is the editor, publisher and economist for DisneyBizJournal.com; and author of the Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries, the Alliance of Saint Michael novels, and assorted nonfiction books. Have Ray Keating speak your group, business, school, church, or organization. Email him at raykeating@keatingreports.com.

 

The views expressed here are his own – after all, no one else should be held responsible for this stuff, right?

 

The Disney Planner: The TO DO List Solution combines a simple, powerful system for getting things done with encouragement and fun for Disney fans, including those who love Mickey, Marvel, Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Pixar, princesses and more.

 

Never miss any new book by Ray Keating by joining the Pastor Stephen Grant Fellowship with Ray Keating at

https://www.patreon.com/pastorstephengrantfellowship.

 

Various books by Ray Keating…

 

• The Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries. There are 19 books in the series now.

 

• Cathedral: An Alliance of Saint Michael Novel is at Amazon

 

• Order The Weekly Economist III: Another 52 Quick Reads to Help You Think Like an EconomistThe Weekly Economist II: 52 More Quick Reads to Help You Think Like an Economist, and The Weekly Economist: 52 Quick Reads to Help You Think Like an Economist at Amazon.com.

 

• Signed editions of Ray’s books are at www.raykeatingbooksandmore.com

 

Also, check out Ray’s podcasts – the Daily Dose of DisneyFree Enterprise in Three Minutes, and the PRESS CLUB C Podcast.